Traveling is an exciting experience, but it can also inspire some separation anxiety for both you and your dog. Anytime you leave for an extended amount of time, it’s important that you make arrangements to have your pet cared for. You can make the transition easier for everyone with a little planning.

Get a Trusted Pet Sitter

Whether you are leaving home for business or pleasure, it’s essential that you find someone trustworthy and compassionate to watch your dog for you. You don’t want to be vacationing and consumed with anxiety over how your pet is faring during your visit to the Avengers Campus

Ask a friend or relative who loves animals if they will look after your cherished pet while you are away. If possible, try to arrange for someone to stay in your home so your dog’s routine can remain as familiar as possible. It’s a great idea to have your pet sitter interact with your dog with your present, so they become accustomed to the other person and feel secure with them.  Another option is to board your dog at a reputable kennel. You can check it out in advance so you are comfortable with the level of care that is provided. 

Give Detailed Care Instructions

No one knows your dog as well as you do, so leave a detailed schedule and instructions for whoever is watching your pet. Include feeding times and amounts as well as information and dosages for any medications they take.

Provide your sitter with lists of your dog’s normal behaviors, favorite toys, and preferred methods of play. Give them a breakdown of the daily routine. You should also leave them with your contact information, as well as the name and number of your veterinarian in case of emergencies. 

Make Your Dog’s ID Is Current

It’s possible that your pet may become a little stressed when you are not around. This could cause them to wander off, especially if they are in an unfamiliar environment. To reduce the risk of your pet getting lost, obtain an ID tag with your contact information that can be placed on their collar, so if they stray, they can be returned home easily. 

Handle Any Upcoming Vet Visits Beforehand

If your travel time overlaps with an annual checkup or a visit to monitor a health concern, make the appointment before you go. Both you and your pet sitter will rest more easily knowing that all is well and there are no significant problems to watch out for. 

This is also a good time to refill and prescription medications and stock up on the proper kind of food and any additional supplements that you give your dog on a regular basis. Having all of that on hand will prevent an interruption in a medicine schedule that could affect your pet’s health.

Leave Behind Something of Yours

Some dogs are more anxious than others and may feel calmer if you leave them an old t-shirt or object that has your scent to ward off separation anxiety. Even if your pet normally shows no signs of distress in your absence, this can be a good way to prevent any adverse behavior and offer comfort. 

Acclimate Your Dog To Your Absence

When you know that you are going to be leaving, you can start to get your dog accustomed to you being away from home. Start small by running errands or otherwise staying away from your home for short periods of time. You can even spend a period of the day in a different room where your pet doesn’t have constant access to you. Over time, they will realize that being apart from you is normal and nothing to fear. 

Any time that you do leave, remember to keep your goodbyes and greetings brief. While you understandably missed your dog as much as he missed you, acting overly emotional when you head out the door or come home will teach them that heightened emotions should be associated with your absence. They may come to feel stress when away from you, and act out. You can absolutely show your affection to your dog freely, but do it during playtime and throughout the day, not when you first arrive back home. 

If you take the necessary steps to see to your dog’s wellbeing while you are away, you will be able to relax and enjoy your trip. Leave the worries behind and be secure in the knowledge that your pet is safe and will be ready to welcome you back upon your return. 


About the Author: Kevin Gardner works as a business consultant and unwinds by getting out of the office to spend time with his dogs, Stuart and Pepper. He enjoys writing about the things he’s learned as a pupper parent and loves to share his insights to help others.