The French bulldog is a world-class lap dog with irresistible looks—guaranteed to bring a smile to anyone’s face with its wrinkly face, bat-like ears, and a sturdy body. Originally known as the Bouledogue Français, it’s usually called the Frenchie and is one of the most popular breeds in the US. 

Thanks to its affectionate and entertaining nature, the Frenchie was born to be your companion. And that’s not all! Here’s everything that makes French Bulldogs so special:

They’re The Ideal Companion

The French bulldog is the best companion for families with kids, singles, couples… really anyone. They love children, and it’s probably one of the main reasons they continue to be so popular. They get along well with kids regardless of whether it’s a teenager or toddler.

Compared to other breeds, French bulldogs have a great temperament, and they’ll stay gentle and calm even when kids get rowdy. Loving, loyal and playful, the Frenchie thrives on human contact and enjoys lavishing love as much as receiving it. 

They’re gentle goofballs happy to lie at your feet all day or follow you from room to room. They love with all the strength in their small body and are a constant presence; a true testament that beauty lies on the inside. 

Sleek Coats Of Many Colors

French bulldogs come in various colors,  with nine officially recognized by judges, breeders, and the American Kennel Club (AKC). They include cream, fawn, multiple shades of brindle—a coat patterned with streaks and specks of light and dark markings like the striking tiger brindle, black brindle, or brindle pied. 

French bulldogs can be any color except solid black, mouse, a light steely gray, or liver, a solid reddish-brown with brown pigmentation on the nose and lips. They also can’t be black with white or tan, and you should run from anyone who tells you that a particular color is rare and thus worth more money. 

Easy Care

The Frenchie is relatively easy to groom and only needs occasional brushing to keep the coat healthy. They’re average shedders and you must start grooming your French bulldog at an early age. Teaching your pup to stand on a table or the floor makes the experience easier for both of you. 

With positive experiences and proper training during puppyhood, grooming should be a wonderful bonding time for you and your Frenchie. Take time to check for any bare spots, skin lesions, scabs, flaky, rough skin, or infections when grooming at any stage of life. 

You must trim the nails regularly to avoid tearing and splitting since French bulldogs don’t naturally wear their nails down. 

Very Opinionated

French bulldogs don’t love to bark, but they’re opinionated and love to talk. Most owners believe they speak their own language and are adored for all the little noises they tend to make. From whining to snorting, they express themselves with all kinds of sounds. 

Couple that with their sweet eyes, and it’s difficult to resist giving your Frenchie precisely what they want, whether it’s a treat or a hug. 

Reputation for Stubbornness

French bulldogs can be pretty stubborn and manipulative. Don’t let their size fool you, they’re very opinionated free thinkers! You must show them that you mean what you say with absolute consistency.

While food is an excellent motivator, it may lead to a fat Frenchie who will only obey you when you wave a cookie. A more sensible training method is recommended. Many different training techniques are successful with this breed, so don’t give up if one way doesn’t work. 

Turn the training into a game with lots of fun and prizes, and with a bit of patience and motivation, they’re more than willing to learn. 

Exercise

French bulldogs have relatively low energy levels and don’t need a lot of exercise. However, you may find that there are exceptions to the rule. They need daily exercise to keep their weight in check, and this can involve playtimes in the yard or short walks. 

French bulldogs enjoy playing and spend much of their time in various activities. Due to their low energy levels, they don’t need prolonged exercise or a large yard. They’re prone to heat exhaustion and you should be careful of exercising your Frenchie in hot temperatures. Cool mornings and evenings are the opportune time for walks and active play. 

They’re A Brachycephalic Breed

You can identify the brachycephalic breed of dogs by their shortened faces or snouts that appear flat. As a result, they have smaller airways and narrow nostrils. Thanks to their uniquely structured heads, breeds like French bulldogs have some health considerations. 

The smaller nose and short face can make breathing difficult and inefficient. Tolerance to humidity, heat and too much exercise is low, and you must ensure your Frenchie remains cool in hot weather, preferably in air-conditioned spaces. 

If your pup is spitting up foam or has unusually noisy breathing, consult your vet right away because there may be something obstructing their airway, or their nostrils may be pinched. Apart from respiratory issues, French bulldogs are also susceptible to spinal disorders, heart disease, eye diseases, and joint diseases. 

Always seek health clearances to prove the dog has been tested and cleared of particular conditions. You can expect approvals from the Orthopedic Foundation for Animals (OFA) or the Canine Eye Registry Foundation (CERF) for French bulldogs. You should be ready for any issues that may come up, and it’s recommended that you have a pet insurance plan to stay prepared. 

They’re Surprisingly Good, Adaptable Watchdogs

Don’t let their small size let you think your French bulldog can’t defend you. The Frenchie is knowledgeable and protective of their home and family. They don’t bark much but will alert you of approaching strangers or when someone is at the door and can be pretty territorial.  

They’re also very adaptable and can be perfectly happy in a country house or an apartment. 

Final Thoughts

For more than 100 years, the French bulldog has delighted everyone from high society to ordinary working folk. The Frenchie continues to win hearts and enchant wherever he goes, from England to France and the US!


About the Author: Dylan Dove is the president of Barkspot and loves to contribute information about pets and dogs, and network with related sites.