Does your dog seem to love the couch even more than you? Whether they were intentionally bred that way or just born with a super laid-back temperament, some dogs love to be lazy. For many dog owners who live in apartments or elderly retirement centers, a low-energy dog is an ideal addition. Barring any adverse health issues or physical injuries, a slow, snuggly pup is cause for celebration, not concern.

But though you may not know it from the way they sleep the day away, even low-energy dogs need at least a little mental stimulation and exercise to stay healthy.

Give your low-energy dog a happy jolt with these fun and stimulating interactive dog toys.

Noise Toys

Even dogs that don’t show a ton of interest in toys can usually be roused by the sound of a high pitched squeaky. Still, if they’re not fully invested they may fail to take initiative and solicit the squeak themselves.

A better option might be to find toys that make noise all on their own. Perfect if your fur baby isn’t a big chewer.

Pet Qwerks makes an interactive dog toy called the Babble Ball that mimics realistic animal noises from more than 20 species. You have your everyday dog and cat calls all the way up to more exotic sounds like lamb bleats and frog croaks.

Motion sensors on this “virtual zoo” mean all your dog need do is walk past or give it a nudge for noise. A timer turns it off automatically, saving you from having to change out the batteries too often. The durable exterior also comes in three sizes, and your pup is sure to have a ball!

Animal Look-a-Likes

Your dog may choose her bed over almost anything in the world, but somewhere deep inside she’s still a hunter.

A set of hide-a-prey toys could be just what she needs to awaken her instincts!

Choose from four different Outward Hound characters including bees and the ever-popular squirrels. These plushy prey come hidden away in their own private tree trunk. Your dog will be able to go on the hunt to seek their squeaky centers.

Ideal for large and small breeds, especially of the hound dog variety!

Treat Toys

Most mutts are about as food motivated as they come. For years peanut butter-filled Kongs have been engaging and pacifying pups of all breeds. They’re still a wonderful way to keep your dog distracted in a crate or otherwise entertained while you’re away.

But they’re by no means the only interactive treat toys on the market.

High-tech toys like those from Clever Pet have been called “the world’s first game console for dogs.” With programmable puzzles and its own app, it’s the automatic feeder of the future. If your dog can identify patterns and complete the color quizzes on the touchpad, they’re rewarded with a treat.

Prefer something a little more analog? The Omega Paw Tricky Treat Ball only requires your pet to move it around to access their reward. It’s durable yet soft, making it easy to chase, carry, nose around, or shake out the healthy dog treats. Best part? It’ll only run you between $5-10 bones!

Food Puzzles

Whether your dog eats so fast they upset their stomachs, or you simply want to make the most of mealtimes, plenty of pet parents appreciate seeing their dogs work for their supper.

Order some high-quality kibble and check out a few of our favorite interactive dog food puzzles.

Nina Ottosson makes a line of food puzzles of varying difficulty levels. Some start simply with treats hidden under blocks or compartments that are relatively easy to nudge open. Others, like the interactive twister dog game, invite them to learn more complex efforts to dislodge the foods.

Ultimately, low energy could be a sign of boredom. It could also simply be part of your dog’s personality makeup. In any event, the interactive dog toys mentioned here are sure to put some pep in their paws!


About the Author: Mitch Felderhoff joined his family business in May of 2007 after graduating from the University of North Texas. After several years working in sales, Mitch took on the responsibility of marketing, new product development, and was named Vice President of Muenster Milling in 2009. With the company now firmly in the 4th generation of Felderhoff’s, Mitch’s commitment to excellence is stronger than ever. When Mitch isn’t working on extruding dry pet foods, he is a husband and loving father of three boys.